Student Opportunity: REU in Biotech deadline 2/4/2011

Western Kentucky University seeks talented science students to participate in its summer National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program in investigative biotechnology.  Thirteen faculty members in Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics and Computer Science will serve as mentors to accepted students.  Students will receive a stipend of $480 per week, free housing, meal and travel allowances, and lab supplies.

Student Opportunity: NIST Gaithersburg

Students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents majoring in science, mathematics and engineering may apply to participate in a variety of research programs with the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Gaithersburg, MD Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program for students.  NIST will provide a $4,500 stipend as well as housing to students who participate for the full 11 week program.

Opportunity: Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program (Deadline 9/15/2009)

The Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program is a competitive peer-reviewed grant program created in 1987 by the 70th Texas Legislature. The purpose of the program is to encourage and provide support to faculty members and students in Texas institutions of higher education, both public and independent, to conduct basic research.

Brief pre-proposals are due September 15, with full proposals due in January.  Proposals MUST involve undergraduate researchers, who may be paid salary or wages.  Faculty salary is capped at $3,000 in summer compensation for the duration of the 24 month grant.  Interested faculty should create an account in the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s online system.

Computer Science MRI receives additional funding

The National Science Foundation has awarded $16,000 to Trinity University’s Computer Science Department to support student researchers.  This award is a supplement to a Major Research Instrumentation grant awarded to Drs. Zhang, Lewis, Massingill and Drennon last year.  The project is titled “Distributed Intelligent Agent Systems Infrastructure for Research and Education at Trinity University.”

Trinity awarded NSF Noyce Fellowships, Scholarships

Paul Kelleher, Jeff Nordine, Patricia Norman, of Trinity University’s Department of Education, have successfully solicited two National Science Foundation grants to support the training of teachers in science and mathematics.

The first, Noyce Teaching Fellowships, will provide scholarships and salary supplements to individuals with professional degrees and work experience in STEM fields who are seeking to enter the teaching profession. The total grant amount of $1,487,725 will support ten “career-changers” over 6 years.

The second grant, titled “Noyce Scholarships”, provides $595,643 to support  scholarships for Trinity STEM majors to offset the costs of their senior and MAT years.  This grant will also support four undergraduate internships each summer to science students who want to work on curriculum development or other education projects.

Both grants also provide administrative and salary support.

The Teaching Fellows grant was made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.